Spain, in 5 ingredients

Chickpea Chorizo Stew 1

Once, then I’m done: Some days, lupus bites. Not in a lovely, peppery vinaigrette sort of way. In a rocks-in-my-soup sort of way. I felt so good all summer, then boom. I turned away for just a moment, and the wolf walked in the door.

It’s no wonder, really. We spent a week in Spain for a wedding, plus a long weekend in Rhode Island for another wedding. It all adds up to Too Much Fun. It was lovely, of course – the jamon iberico, watching the Vuelta a Espana’s last time trial, seeing cousins I hadn’t seen in (literally) decades, participating in weddings I wouldn’t have missed for the world . . . But coming home, we had sort of a crash landing. Graham didn’t adjust back to our time zone as well as he had going the other direction, and between his schedule, our own jetlag, and three good cases of the sniffles, we’ve been a mess. And my body has not been happy.

Thankfully, the one taste I had to bring back from our trip – the flavor of Spain that lingered on my tongue, through all the ham, through the weird Oktoberfest meal on Lufthansa, through the Willow Tree chicken salad reunion (me and the chicken salad) in Newport – was the simplest of stews. We had it at a roadside restaurant, driving from La Rioja back to Madrid in a rented 6-speed diesel minivan. (As a side note, I do not recommend driving a large vehicle through the heart of Madrid if there’s even a small chance your iPhone, with all its hoo-ha navigational capabilities, will lose power.)

Considering our lack of Spanish, you could say we ordered the soup on accident. It was hardly a looker – just chickpeas, soaking in a simple broth with little beads of paprika-spiked oil bobbing around on the surface. Studded with slices of mild chorizo, it went down easy, rich but not overwhelming, unmistakably Spanish but after 8 days of ham, appreciably different. It had the kind of broth you want to drink for days on end, like a tonic.

When I sat down to think about how to make it, I felt like my brain wasn’t working. If I sautéed chorizo and then simmered it, along with dried chickpeas, in a paprika-rich homemade stock, the legumes would soak up some of that meaty flavor. But wasn’t there more? Five ingredients didn’t seem like enough.

But they were plenty. And an hour later, there it was: Spain. I’d purchased bulk chorizo, instead of the regular kind in casings, which made it a bit different from the version I fell in love with. (If you must know, I don’t like the way sausage slices look cooked with the casings on. The way the exterior shrinks up and strangles the meat reminds me of putting nylons on – you know, when they’re only partway up your thighs? Uncomfortable, and a little gross.)

Of course, the one thing missing from the roadside stew – the same thing, frankly, that was missing from so many of my meals in Spain – was the color green. I served ours over sautéed kale.

This could very well be The Fall I Didn’t Make Pie. Peeling apples just doesn’t seem to be an option right now. My hands are too sore.

But soup. Soup can be easy.

Thank goodness.

Chickpea Chorizo Stew 2
Quick Chorizo and Chickpea Stew (PDF)

Brimming with more flavor than a stew that takes 10 minutes of attention really deserves, this hearty concoction was my favorite meal from our recent trip to Spain. I used bulk chorizo, but sliced (sausage-style) chorizo would work well also (and was what we ate in Spain). Homemade chicken stock is important here—use yours, if you have some.

Serve the stew as is, or try ladling it over sautéed greens, such as kale or chard, or over leftover rice.

TIME: 10 minutes prep time
MAKES: 4 servings

1 1/4 cup dried chickpeas
6 cups good chicken stock
3/4 pound chorizo (bulk or in casings, thinly sliced)
1/2 teaspoon smoked Spanish paprika (Pimenton de la Vera)
Salt and freshly ground pepper

Bring the chickpeas and 4 cups of the stock to a boil in a soup pot. Cover, remove from heat, and let sit for 1 hour.

Preheat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Crumble the chorizo into the pan (or add the sliced chorizo) and cook, stirring and breaking into bite-sized pieces after the first 5 minutes, until cooked through, about 10 minutes. Transfer meat to the pan with the chickpeas, stir in the paprika and the remaining 2 cups stock, and season with salt and pepper. Simmer for 1 hour, until the beans are soft.

Season to taste, and serve hot.

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8 Comments

Filed under gluten-free, Lunch, lupus, pork, recipe, soup, vegetables

8 responses to “Spain, in 5 ingredients

  1. This sounds so perfect! I love that you describe it as a tonic – something we all need once in a while.

  2. Delish! Yes the spanish cuisine is in desperate need of veggies…but please do us all a favor and travel to the basque region next time. I have never eaten such good food in my life…or go to a basque restaurant in Boise- same same I am sure. SO NICE TO SEE YOU GUS!

  3. Sarah

    Ah Jess, you’ve done it again – to no one’s surprise. It’s only 0946 in the morning and already my mouth is watering and I’m wishing I was in the kitchen cooking instead of staring at the computer screen.
    Perfectly described and tantalizing to boot. Thank you for what will surely be another gem.

  4. Jessica

    Yum – made it with soy chorizo from trader joe’s and it was sooo good! Thanks!

  5. Hi Jess: I sent you some blog love over at unfussyfare.com. I really enjoy reading your blog. Best, Gillian

  6. Mmmm. Spain in a bowl. I think I’ll try it with soy chorizo like Jessica above.

    You could always buy apple pie filling…(Just kidding, that stuff is truly vile. Better to go without.) Sorry to hear that you are hurting. I just wrote about making my first apple pie of the season and it turns out that my almost three year old, Thomas, can now do most of the peeling himself. Perhaps in a couple of years Graham can stand in as your sous chef?

  7. Sara

    Just made this last night, didn’t have the time or energy to deal with dried chickpeas so used canned. Not the same I’m sure, but for a quick and easy dinner it was delicious. We served it over kale which was a nice addition. Thanks for the yummy recipe.

  8. This was for me a nice introduction to some Spanish flavors and cooking with dry garbanzo beans. Short writeup on my blog. Thanks!

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